Six positive ways drones can be used

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Experts predict drones will be delivering parcels in the UK within „a couple of years” An extended 5km (3.1 miles) no-fly zone for drones has come into force around airports in the UK after reported sightings at Gatwick, Heathrow and Dublin airports in recent months grounded hundreds of flights and left thousands stranded.
Previously, only a 1km (0.6 mile) exclusion zone was in place.
But despite the negative reputation they have received, the use of drones isn't all bad.
From finding missing people to delivering takeaways, here are some of the ways the unmanned aircraft can be beneficial.
1. RescuesA Norfolk man who went missing in June last year was only found when a police drone spotted him stuck on a marsh.
Peter Pugh, 75, was walking home through Titchwell Marshes when the tide came in. He said he attempted to swim to the next field, but was blocked by dense reed beds.
Twenty-two hours after he went missing, a police drone recorde..

IBM used Flickr photos for facial-recognition project

Image copyright LightRocket Image caption IBM says it has taken care to comply with privacy principles IBM has been accused of using Flickr photos for a facial-recognition project, without the full consent of people in the images.
The company extracted nearly one million photos from a dataset of Flickr images originally compiled by Yahoo.
But many people pictured were probably unaware of how their data had been used, according to an NBC News report.
IBM said in a statement that it had taken great care to comply with privacy principles.
But one digital rights group said IBM's actions represented a „huge threat” to people's privacy,
„None of the people I photographed had any idea their images were being used in this way,” a photographer told NBC News.
Photos selected by IBM were listed under a Creative Commons licence, which generally means the images can be widely used with only a small number of restrictions.
In a paper published online about the work, IBM researchers descr..

Jumia to be first African start-up on NY Stock Exchange

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Jumia delivers goods via scooter and offers a variety of payment options An e-commerce company based in Nigeria is to become the first African start-up to be listed on the New York Stock Exchange.
Jumia could go public in the next month.
The company, which was given a $1bn valuation in 2016, offers a range of online goods and has branched into food delivery, hotel and flight booking and mobile tariffs.
It had four million active consumers at the end of 2018.
The online retailer was founded in Lagos by two French entrepreneurs in 2012 and now offers services to most of the African population, in countries such as South Africa, Tanzania, Egypt and Ivory Coast.
Its largest shareholder is MTN, Africa's biggest telecoms company.
No share price or valuation has been given but there is speculation Jumia could be valued at $1.5bn, despite the fact that it reported a loss of 170m euros ($192m) in 2018.
In documents filed in New York, Jumia warned..

Cartoons about online safety launched for four-year-olds

Image copyright NCA Image caption In the cartoons, Jessie and her friends encounter negative experiences online Children aged four to seven are being targeted in a new online video campaign from the National Crime Agency (NCA).
The series of videos called Jessie & Friends is intended to teach children how to keep themselves safe online, with a view to protecting them from sexual abuse and other threats.
Children will be directed to Jessie & Friends via „video clips and a catchy song” on social media sites.
The NSPCC described the move as „a positive step”.
Jessie & Friends features three animated children who explore online videos and social media – but they soon realise that dangers are lurking there.
In the first episode, Jessie watches a seemingly innocuous video of a happy crocodile that suddenly changes to feature an angry version of the reptile instead.
Such videos, which can disturb young children, have been known to proliferate on YouTube and other sites.
Most British three- t..

Tackle tech giants’ ‘bullying tactics’ review urges

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Jason Furman was Barack Obama's chief economic adviser The UK needs to tackle „bullying tactics by market leaders” and the other consequences of a lack of competition in the technology sector, according to a new report.
A six month review of the sector has concluded tech giants like Facebook and Google should face greater competition.
Philip Hammond will give his initial response to the report in his Spring Statement later on Wednesday.
The review was led by Barack Obama's former economic advisor, Jason Furman.
The Harvard professor headed a panel exploring what impact the dominance of a small number of large tech firms is having on consumer choice and innovation.
TechUK, the body representing the UK tech industry said UK tech firms had created thousands of jobs and „embraced the principles of fair and open competition”.
'Bullying tactics'The report said there needed to be quicker and simpler enforcement when a company us..

Tackle tech giants’ ‘bullying tactics’ review urges

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Jason Furman was Barack Obama's chief economic adviser The UK needs to tackle „bullying tactics by market leaders” and the other consequences of a lack of competition in the technology sector, according to a new report.
A six month review of the sector has concluded tech giants like Facebook and Google should face greater competition.
Philip Hammond will give his initial response to the report in his Spring Statement later on Wednesday.
The review was led by Barack Obama's former economic advisor, Jason Furman.
The Harvard professor headed a panel exploring what impact the dominance of a small number of large tech firms is having on consumer choice and innovation.
TechUK, the body representing the UK tech industry said UK tech firms had created thousands of jobs and „embraced the principles of fair and open competition”.
'Bullying tactics'The report said there needed to be quicker and simpler enforcement when a company us..

Elon Musk denies being in contempt of court

Image copyright Getty Images Elon Musk has denied that a tweet about Tesla placed him in contempt of court.
In February, he tweeted about Tesla's production ambitions, suggesting that in 2019 the carmaker would make 500,000 vehicles.
However, he had previously agreed a settlement with the US financial regulator which restricted his use of social media to talk about the firm.
This was following tweets about taking Tesla private, which upset investors and which he later retracted.
The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) had asked the courts to hold him in contempt for violating the settlement following his tweet on 19 February.
Image Copyright @elonmusk @elonmusk Report Image Copyright @elonmusk @elonmusk Report He later posted a second tweet clarifying that he expected deliveries for the year would be around 400,000 as previously estimated.
In court documents Mr Musk's lawyer argues that „there is no basis to issue contempt sanctions against him”.
The tweet in question w..